Equine Centre


24hr Emergency & Intensive Care


Hospital/Intensive care

  • 24 Hour Care
  • Critical Care for Neonates and Adults
Sick foals require intensive care to manage their feeding and fluid requirements which don’t stop just because it’s night time! We provide 24 hour intensive care from our highly qualified nursing staff, hospital residents and specialist veterinarians. We have the most sophisticated equipment available to constantly monitor electrolytes, blood gases and glucose levels within the blood so that each foal receives the optimum fluid therapy, nutrition and oxygen therapy. In house blood testing, and regular ultrasound are used to keep ahead of developing problems and monitor response to therapy. Hospital staff will check on foals and their mothers around the clock to make sure that they are receiving exactly the right treatment and detect changes before they become a problem.



Specialised Neonate Facilities
We have special mare and foal boxes equipped with foal ‘cages’, foal beds, fluid pumps for intravenous fluid delivery, oxygen and heating facilities to enable us to cater for all types of foals. Mares are able to be kept close to their foals without risk of injury while allowing easy access to the foal for hospital staff.

Specialised Isolation Facilities
We have two dedicated isolation boxes which can be used to house and treat horses with potentially contagious infections without risk to other patients within the hospital..

Blood Donor Capabilities
We have horses that have been blood tested and can be used as ‘universal donors’ for blood transfusions to other horses. This means that these horses do not have the Aa and Qa antibodies that are most often associated with adverse transfusion reactions. Blood is therefore available at very short notice for administration to critically ill patients that need a transfusion.

Large Animal Sling for Recumbent Adult Horses

The U-Vet Werribee Equine Centre has several large animal slings that can be used to support horses that are temporarily unable to hold their own bodyweight due to neurological, metabolic or musculoskeletal disease.