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Emergency Call: (03) 9731 2000

Our Services


Small Animal Medicine

Small Animal Medicine - Werribee Vet Clinic

The small animal medicine referral service investigates and treats a wide range of medical cases in cats and dogs. We provide specialist advice and management for pets with cancer (including chemotherapy in our dedicated oncology area), cardiac or respiratory disorders, blood disorders, hormonal disease, digestive and urinary disorders.

We only see animals that are referred by their regular veterinarian, and offer services throughout the week to animals throughout Victoria and beyond.

In addition to our daily regular appointments, we also run special clinics (senior pets, lower urinary tract, gastrointestinal and diabetes) that concentrate on specific problems and allow us to combine the best in cutting edge technology with the latest in compassionate animal care.

Information for owners 

What is internal medicine
Internal medicine is the investigation and treatment of anything ‘inside’ the body. This means digestive disorders (gastroenterology); heart disease (cardiology); hormonal diseases such as diabetes, thyroid disorders; cancer (oncology); respiratory disease such as asthma; diseases of the kidneys and bladder (urology); and diseases of the immune system.

What to expect during your consultation
We are a teaching hospital, which means that students will be involved in assessing your pet. Students never perform procedures that are not fully supervised, or take responsibility for any decisions regarding management of your pet.
We also train residents, who are veterinarians undertaking training to become a specialist in internal medicine. All of the staff in internal medicine are either qualified specialists or are undertaking the training (i.e. residents). Residents discuss management of every case at length with the specialists on staff.
This means that your pet is always under the direct or indirect care of a specialist in internal medicine when referred to our service.
When you first arrive, allow one hour for the consultation.
  • Lithotripsy can be done in most female dogs and large male dogs that have uroliths in bladder or urethra - we would assess patient suitability at the time of referral contact
  • The dog is anaesthetised during the procedure, and with the help of a cystoscope a laser fibre is brought in close contact with the urolith and activated.
  • The laser is powerful, but travels only as far as 2 mm, and is used under endoscopic guidance. The risk of procedural complications is low.
  • The treatment is minimally invasive - no cuts, no surgical recovery time, dog is likely to go home the same day, which may reduce the overall cost of the procedure
  • Lithotripsy can be considered as an emergency treatment in dogs with urinary tract obstruction due to uroliths in the urethra. No cuts are made in the urethra; hence the risk of postoperative stricture formation in this area is reduced.
  • It may suit a number of dogs where surgery is potentially associated with complications - e.g. dogs with liver disease (may have an increased risk of bleeding and poor wound healing), dogs with Cushing's disease (may have an increased risk of poor wound healing)
  • Lithotripsy works regardless of the stone composition. (However, in dogs with large uroliths or many of them, long anaesthesia times are anticipated, and therefore lithotripsy is particularly useful when <5 uroliths are present and these are small (<2 cm).)
  • Lithotripsy could be used as a minimal invasive means to obtain samples from stones for stone analysis. This may be useful in patients with recurrent urolithiasis or in patients where it is unclear why medical dissolution is not working
  • Lithotripsy is done under endoscopic guidance, which will also give information about potential predisposing factors and aid in assessing the risk of recurrence.

Hyperthyroidism in cats is a disease caused by the over-production of thyroid hormone by the thyroid gland. It is usually caused by a benign tumour that grows in the gland, and this may occasionally be felt as a swelling on your cat’s neck. The disease causes a variety of symptoms, including hyperactivity, weight loss (occasionally weight gain), excessive drinking and urinating, increased (often ravenous) appetite, vomiting and diarrhoea. If untreated, the disease will eventually lead to serious heart disease, kidney disease, emaciation and death. Your veterinarian will have confirmed the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism by using a blood test that measures the level of thyroid hormone in the blood, and referred you to us for treatment of the condition.

We have been using radioactive iodine to treat hyperthyroidism in cats since the late 1980’s. The treatment is extremely safe for your cat, it is not at all painful, and does not cause any serious side effects. It is considered the most effective way of treating this disease as 90-95% of cats are permanently cured with a single treatment, and is used by Universities and Veterinary Specialist Centres all over the world. It is also one of the ways that hyperthyroidism is treated in humans. We generally see appointments on Mondays to evaluate patient suitability for treatment and to discuss this in detail.

The treatment is simple, but because it involves the use of a radioactive compound, there are strict laws in Australia relating to how it is given and the subsequent management of the patient. Our facility is licenced to give this treatment. The radioactive iodine is given by mouth in a capsule by specially trained and licenced staff. We sedate your cat first to avoid any struggle (some cats don’t like taking medicines at all!) and to minimise the chance of accidental spillage of the radioactive iodine. We check carefully that the dose has been swallowed properly, and then the cat is placed in a cage in our special isolation room, here at the Clinic and Hospital. A radiation monitor is used to verify uptake of the compound by the thyroid gland.

By law, the cat must remain in isolation for at least one week following treatment and until radiation levels decline to a safe value. We usually treat on Tuesdays and your cat will be able to go home on the following Tuesday in most cases. The patient is checked regularly each day and is fed twice daily. You may supply your own tinned and/or dry food if your cat is a particularly fussy eater, but we provide good quality cat food and most patients have a very good appetite. We also provide water, bedding material and a litter tray, which is changed daily. If you do wish to provide any bedding, it will stay with your cat throughout their stay but it cannot be returned to you.

After discharge from the hospital


1. As your cat will still be excreting small amounts of radiation, we recommend that you limit close (less than one metre) and prolonged (more than 20 minutes per day) contact with your cat for another two weeks. That means limited lap time and not sleeping on the bed at night. This is particularly important for children and pregnant women, and we recommend that they have no contact with the cat during this time. You should also wear gloves to empty litter trays, and double bag any soiled litter before disposal. After the two weeks, you can return to handling your cat normally.

2. Please arrange for your regular veterinarian to check your cat and take a blood sample to check the thyroid hormone level ONE MONTH after discharge from here. This will allow us to check how the treatment has worked. Kidney function is checked at the same time. Transient low thyroid hormone levels are not uncommon initially. Some cats will also initially have high thyroid hormone but this returns to normal over a few months. Therefore, the final effect of treatment is decided at THREE-FOUR months. For most cats, the signs of hyperthyroidism usually resolve over the first few weeks at home. Most cats are cured by a single treatment, but 5-10% may require re-treatment and 2.5% of cats can need treatment for low thyroid hormone in the long term.

A sedative is a medication, which takes away anxiety or aggressiveness in your pet and allows us to perform diagnostic tests or treatment more safely, whilst improving the comfort of your pet. Sedation is not the same as anaesthesia. During sedation your animal does not have a tube in the airways and is not fully asleep: your pet and can usually respond to some stimuli. The effects of sedation usually reduce when the medication is metabolized and excreted (within few hours to one day).

We recommend that your pet has not eaten in the 12 hours before examination and sedation to avoid any vomiting when the sedative is given. Any sedation or anaesthesia carries an anaesthetic risk, that is, the risk of reactions to the medication and/or the risk of excessive effects on heart, circulation and breathing. Problems with sedation and or anaesthesia occur uncommonly, and most patients recover uneventfully from sedation or anaesthesia. We will guide you through the procedures, and inform you specifically if the risk is thought to be higher than average in your pet.
Anaesthesia means introducing a state of unconsciousness, like an “artificial sleep”. Your pet will not feel pain during anaesthesia, and, after your pet wakes up, it will not remember what happened during anaesthesia. Anaesthesia is usually started with an injection, and continued with inhalation of anaesthetic gas. During anaesthesia, your pet will have an endotracheal tube placed in the airway, and vital functions (e.g. heart and breathing rate) will be monitored. Some pets cough immediately after endotracheal tube placement. The coughing usually resolves without further medication within 1-2 days.

We recommend that your pet has not eaten in the 12 hours before examination and anaesthesia to avoid any vomiting when anaesthesia is given. Any sedation or anaesthesia carries an anaesthetic risk, that is, the risk of reactions to the medication and/or the risk of excessive effects on heart, circulation and breathing. Problems with sedation and or anaesthesia occur uncommonly, and many patients recover uneventfully from sedation or anaesthesia. We will guide you through the procedures, and inform you specifically if the risk is thought to be higher than average in your pet.
Is a diagnostic procedure that allows the assessment of some internal organs, via natural openings (such as the mouth or nose). An endoscope is a sophisticated fibreoptic camera, with which the surface of internal organs can be examined, photographed or videotaped.

Endoscopy is useful for diagnosing underlying disorders of the breathing system (such as nose bleeding or nasal discharge, coughing or breathing problems), digestive system (such as vomiting or diarrhea) or urinary system (such as urinary incontinence). In these instances, endoscopy may be recommended to you.

Endoscopy is a minimally invasive procedure, that is, there is usually only a very short recovery period from the procedure, and there are usually no surgical wounds or sutures. Your pet is often able to be discharged from the hospital within one or two days. In some instances, a preparation period before the procedure is necessary – we will advise you if that is the case.

To assure that your pet is comfortable during the procedure, anaesthesia is required. Once your pet is asleep, the endoscope is introduced into the mouth, nose or urinary tract, and passed along the natural passages, such as trachea (windpipe), oesophagus (food pipe) or urethra (urine tube) to reach internal organs, such as the nose, stomach, lungs or urinary bladder.

During the procedure, we will inspect the internal surface of the respective organs, and note abnormalities, such as ulceration, thickening or masses, foreign bodies, swelling or abnormal discharge. In many instances, we are able to remove foreign bodies. We will often take biopsies or fluid samples from the respective organs. These samples are sent to the laboratory services (microbiology, cytology and/or histopathology), and may help us to diagnose the underlying disease in your pet. The time to receive an answer from the laboratory (turn-around-time) may vary based on the sample that was taken and the tests requested, but is usually between 2 and 4 working days.

There are specific endoscopic instruments that allow sampling of tissue during the respective procedure. When compared to surgery, the samples taken are usually very small (about 3 mm diameter or less), which allows a quicker recovery from the procedure compared to surgery. There may also be some disadvantages of obtaining endoscopic tissue samples. If they are present, we endeavor to discuss these with you before the procedure.
Is the endoscopic examination of the nose. During this procedure, tissue samples (biopsies) are often taken. The nose is a very sensitive organ with many blood vessels, and many dogs or cats have some nose bleeding and sneeze after the biopsies, but this usually improves within 1-3 days.
This is a procedure where a liquid agent (usually a treatment against nasal fungus, e.g. aspergillus) is flushed into the nose and remains there for approximately 1 hour. Your pet is asleep during this procedure, and the liquid is drained at the end of the procedure. Sneezing is common when the pet wakes up, but generally improves within few days.
Is the endoscopic examination of the airways (i.e. larynx (or voicebox), trachea (or windpipe) and bronchi). After the inspection of the airways, we often taken fluid samples called BAL (see below).
During or after bronchoscopy, a small amount of sterile fluid is flushed into the airways. It will mix with the airway secretions. This “mix” is then aspirated back. The sample is sent to the laboratory to identify microorganisms and cells within the sample. Results of this procedure may help to identify infection, inflammatory diseases (such as feline asthma), and sometimes neoplasia (cancer). Some pets cough more after bronchoscopy and BAL. The coughing usually improves within few days.
Is the endoscopic examination of the food pipe. This is often done in an attempt to remove foreign bodies (such as bones, fish hooks, stones or toys). This procedure may also be suggested if your pet is bringing up food repeatedly.
Is the endoscopic examination of the stomach and the first part of the small bowel. It may be recommended to remove foreign bodies in the stomach, or if your pet suffers from weight loss, vomiting and/or diarrhoea. During the procedure tissue samples are often taken.
Is the endoscopic examination of the urinary tract. This procedure may be recommended when your pet has urinary leakage, or has pain or discomfort when urinating. During this procedure, urine samples and/or tissue samples may be taken. In some instances, this procedure may be followed up directly by surgery. We would inform you before the procedure if we consider it likely that a surgical procedure will follow.
Is an advanced imaging procedure. It is similar to traditional radiographs, in that similar rays are deployed. However, compared to traditional radiography, CT is more sensitive. That is, it allows the detection of smaller structures, and it provides more detail of the specific structure. In addition, contrast agents may be injected to highlight certain structures and vessels. A powerful computer reconstructs the images obtained and allows construction of 3D images. Preliminary results are usually available shortly after the procedure, and the final report is often available within 24 hours.

CT can be useful in many different situations; we often suggest this procedure to obtain detailed information about structures in the nose, bones, chest or abdomen.

Your pet often requires sedation or anaesthesia during this procedure. We recommend sedation or anaesthesia because it will make your pet comfortable, and avoid artefacts that may arise when your pet moves. It also protects your pet, our staff and students from excessive radiation.

We work closely with the diagnostic imaging and anaesthesia services when performing CT.

This is another advanced imaging technique, which enables us to get very detailed information about internal structures and organs. MRI provides different information when compared to traditional radiographs and CT.

The technique utilizes the magnetic resonance of atomic nuclei, particularly protons (H+). Images are created by altering magnetic fields around the body, and recording the response of protons to these magnetic field changes. 2D or 3D images are constructed from the responses by a computer. The content of protons differs between individual organs; which enables us to identify normal organ borders and abnormalities.

MRI is very useful when investigating diseases associated with the brain and spine, muscles, heart or abdominal organs. Preliminary results are usually available shortly after the procedure and final reports are often available within 24 hours.

During MRI, your pet has to be completely still, and handling or holding of the patient in the machine is not possible. MRI is also associated with considerable noise. To allow your pet to be comfortable and to obtain great images, anaesthesia is required. Your pet will be monitored carefully during this procedure.

We work closely with the diagnostic imaging and anaesthesia services when performing MRI.

The bone marrow lies in the central canal of bones and produces the cells of the blood like red and white blood cells. Bone marrow examination is helpful in the diagnosis of disordered of bone marrow such as when there is non-regenerative anaemia (low red cell counts), low white cell counts, low platelet counts and unexplained high calcium levels.

Bone marrow aspiration or biopsy involves collection of tissue samples from within the bone marrow. Animals are either heavily sedated and local anaesthetic is used, or they are fully anaesthetised, so that no pain is felt. A special needle is used for collection after inserting through the skin and bone into the central marrow cavity. This is a sterile procedure and the area is carefully prepared prior. The humerus (upper arm) is the usual site of collection. A small stich or tissue glue is used to close the small skin incision. The procedure usually takes about 5-15 minutes.

The bone marrow fluid or tissue is sent to a veterinary pathologist for analysis along with a sample of circulating blood. Aspirate results are usually available within 24 hours, and biopsy results take usually 2-4 days to return. There are few contraindications to this procedure, even in the presence of bleeding disorders. While mild discomfort is common after collection (and can be successfully managed by pain relief), serious complications are extremely rare.

Abdominal ultrasound involves using an ultrasound machine to see the organs within the abdomen via sound waves. The animal’s hair over the abdomen is clipped so a good image can be obtained. Alcohol is used to clean the skin, followed by covering the abdomen with gel, which helps transmission of the sound waves. The probe of the ultrasound is gently pressed again the skin of the abdomen. This procedure is performed by specially trained veterinary radiologists at our hospital. Dogs and cats are usually sedated for this procedure and gently restrained as required.

Abdominal ultrasound is used to investigate disorders of all organs within the abdomen. Abdominal ultrasound is often used to investigate abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhoea, fever, anorexia, abdominal masses, organ enlargement, and abdominal fluid. Ideally animals are fasted (no food, water only) for 12 hours before ultrasound so gas and food in the stomach don’t interfere with the images.

The ultrasound scan takes about 30-60 minutes and preliminary results are known at the end of the scan, with the final report usually available within 24 hours. Abdominal ultrasound is a fast, safe, non-invasive and cost effective way to examine the abdomen without surgery or x-rays.

Abdominal ultrasound can also be used to help direct a small needle through the body wall into an area of interest to collect cells and / or fluid. These samples are then examined by a veterinary pathologist, and cell examination (cytology) and fluid analysis results are usually known within 24 hours. Samples for bacterial growth usually take 2-4 days to return. This is a safe, fast, minimally invasive way to help establish a diagnosis with few and rare complications.
Echocardiography involves using an ultrasound machine to see how the heart is working via sound waves. Small patches of hair over both sides of the chest and sternum are clipped so a good image can be obtained. The skin over the chest is cleaned with alcohol, before gel is applied to help transmission of the sound waves. The probe of the ultrasound is gently pressed against the skin of the chest and two dimensional images of the heart in black and white are produced. This procedure is performed by specially trained internists or radiologists in our hospital. Dogs and cats are usually not sedated for this procedure, and gentle restraint is used as required. Colour is used to help determine the direction and speed of blood flow within the heart.

Echocardiography can provide a wealth of helpful information, including the size, shape and function of the heart and valves, pumping and relaxation capacity, and the location and extent of any tissue damage. Echocardiography is used to investigate heart murmurs, coughing, congenital heart defects, congestive heart failure, and abnormal heart rhythms. Echocardiography is sometimes used to monitor the treatment of heart disease. It is a safe, noninvasive test with no known risks, contraindications or side effects. Echocardiography usually takes 30-60 minutes and preliminary results are known at the end of the scan, with the final report usually available within 24 hours.
Echocardiography involves using an ultrasound machine to see how the heart is working via sound waves. Small patches of hair over both sides of the chest and sternum are clipped so a good image can be obtained. The skin over the chest is cleaned with alcohol, before gel is applied to help transmission of the sound waves. The probe of the ultrasound is gently pressed against the skin of the chest and two dimensional images of the heart in black and white are produced. This procedure is performed by specially trained internists or radiologists in our hospital. Dogs and cats are usually not sedated for this procedure, and gentle restraint is used as required. Colour is used to help determine the direction and speed of blood flow within the heart.

Echocardiography can provide a wealth of helpful information, including the size, shape and function of the heart and valves, pumping and relaxation capacity, and the location and extent of any tissue damage. Echocardiography is used to investigate heart murmurs, coughing, congenital heart defects, congestive heart failure, and abnormal heart rhythms. Echocardiography is sometimes used to monitor the treatment of heart disease. It is a safe, noninvasive test with no known risks, contraindications or side effects. Echocardiography usually takes 30-60 minutes and preliminary results are known at the end of the scan, with the final report usually available within 24 hours.
Chemotherapy is the use of chemicals (drugs) to try and reduce the growth or spread of tumours. In pets, we use chemotherapy to improve survival times in cancer, but make sure that quality of life is always the highest priority. Chemotherapy drugs target different parts of rapidly dividing cells, and so are effective against some types of cancers. There are side effects, as rapidly dividing cells in the bone marrow, or gut can also be affected.

Chemotherapy is only one aspect of cancer care- some tumours can be cured by surgery, some are best treated with a combination of surgery and chemotherapy and others with radiation therapy. The best form of radiation therapy for use in animals with cancer, a linear accelerator, is not available for pets in Victoria. However, we can facilitate radiation therapy in Queensland if possible and indicated. Although all these options are possible, we know that these advanced treatment options are not always the appropriate choice for every animal.

Treatment of animals with cancer requires a large commitment- both in time, emotional energy and expense. Treating animals with cancer is not appropriate for every pet or family. It takes a strong commitment on the part of owners; and cooperation between the specialists, your pet’s regular veterinarian and you. A global approach to cancer- making sure nutrition is optimised, pain relief is adequate and side effects of treatment don’t impact quality of life- is essential to provide the best outcome for your pet.

Although cancer is a scary word, and horrible diagnosis to receive, many pets with cancer respond really well to management options. They often have prolonged periods of remission (no obvious cancer) and stay healthy and happy throughout their treatment. If you are unsure whether your pet is appropriate for chemotherapy or other cancer care, please discuss this with us at your appointment, or with your veterinarian if you are considering referral.

Referral Practice

Our referral practice is open from Monday to Friday, 8am to 5pm. To make appointments or seek case advice, please phone +61 3 9731 2054 or email us at vet-sa-medicine@unimelb.edu.au

Meet the team

Dr Caroline Mansfield
Assoc Prof BSc BVMS PhD MANZCVS DECVIM

Associate Dean - Clinical Programs

Caroline grew up in Perth, and graduated as a veterinarian from Murdoch University. She then worked in mixed animal practice before travelling to the UK to work as a locum in small animal practice. Whilst there, she got bitten by a love for small animal medicine- playing a detective to determine a diagnosis and best treatments for dogs and cats; and was lucky enough to complete a residency training program at University College, Dublin in that discipline. She gained her specialist qualifications (Diplomate, European College of Veterinary Internal Medicine) in 2001, and returned to Murdoch University to work as an academic teacher and clinician. She continued her interest in gastroenterology both in clinics and in research, obtaining her PhD in the field of canine pancreatitis. The move to Melbourne occurred in 2010, and she has been Head of Small Animal Medicine at the University of Melbourne since then, and is currently Associate Dean, Clinical Programs. Her clinical research interest in gastroenterology has continued, and she has a large and successful research group in that area. Caroline is also involved in the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientist, and is Past President of the ANZCVSc Council.

She lives with 2 dogs and 2 cats (all rescues), 1 husband and 3 children (not rescued!). Despite the move to Melbourne, she is still a loyal West Coast Eagles fan.



Dr Adrian Witham
BVSc MANZCVS GCUT DipACVIM

Lecturer and Registered Specialist in Small Animal Medicine

Adrian is a 2000 graduate from the University of Melbourne. After several years in private small animal practice in Melbourne and locum work in the UK, he completed a one year rotating internship at the University of Liverpool, before completing a three year small animal medicine residency at Massey University, New Zealand. Adrian worked at Massey University as a consulting lecturer in E-Learning before returning to the University of Melbourne in 2009. Adrian is an active member of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists by examination, acting as both Head Subject examiner for Small Animal Medicine, Feline & Canine Memberships, President of the Small Animal Medicine Chapter, and Science Week conference convenor. He is a Diplomat of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine by examination since 2009. He has recently completed a Graduate Certificate in University Teaching. Adrian is the head of the DVM-4 small animal medicine rotation, program director for Melbourne University’s ACVIM residency, and academic coordinator of the Veterinary Hospital’s uVet continuing professional development program. Adrian was awarded the Faculty’s Teaching Excellence Award. Adrian’s research interests include feline hyperthyroidism, diabetes, methods of preparing students for extramural placements and computer cased-based teaching and assessment methods. Adrian is passionate about helping dogs, cats, and their loving owners and primary vets.
Dr Lauren Lacorcia
BVSc(Hons) MVSc MACVSc DipACVIM

Lecturer and Registered Specialist in Small Animal Medicine) MVSc MANZCVS DACVIM

Lauren graduated with a Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours) from the University of Melbourne in 1999, and worked in small animal general practice prior to completing an internship at the University and attaining membership of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists in Small Animal Medicine. Lauren subsequently completed her medicine residency at The University of Minnesota and a concurrent Master of Veterinary Science degree through the University of Melbourne, investigating feline parasitology. She became a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine in 2009 and subsequently worked in private specialty referral practice in the UK before returning to Australia and the faculty in 2013.

Her fields of interest include respiratory medicine, urinary disease, gastrointestinal disease, hepatology and immune-mediated and haematologic diseases.


Dr Thurid Johnstone
T PhD, DECVIM-CA

Lecturer and Registered Specialist in Small Animal Medicine

Thurid graduated in Veterinary Science from Leipzig University, Germany, and then completed a PhD with focus on canine and feline urinary tract infections at Massey University in New Zealand. She undertook a rotating internship at the Veterinary Specialist Group in Auckland, New Zealand, and after a residency training in small animal internal medicine in Dublin, Ireland, became a board-certified specialist (DECVIM-CA) in 2010. Upon completion of the residency training, Thurid once again pursued her research interests in urinary tract diseases and antimicrobial resistance of bacteria, before working in a large private small animal hospital in Southern Sweden. In 2013, Thurid joined the team at the U-Vet Werribee Animal Hospital as lecturer and registered specialist in small animal internal medicine (SAIM). She is interested in a variety of medical conditions in dogs and cats, but particularly enjoys the fields of urology and endocrinology. Thurid heads the SAIM urology service, which offers advanced diagnostics and treatment, such as canine cystoscopy and laser lithotripsy, respectively. In her spare time, Thurid enjoys life with her young family, the events that Melbourne has to offer, and participating in a variety of sports, including squash, tennis, Pilates and snowboarding.
Dr Julien Dandrieux
BSc Dr med vet DACVIM (SAIM)

Clinical Researcher

Julien graduated from the University of Bern in Switzerland, in 2002. He did a rotating internship in the same institution from 2003 to 2004, followed by his medicine residency (from 2005 to 2008), which was a joint program between the University of Bern and of Louisiana State University. Julien joined afterwards the University of Liverpool as Clinician teacher at the Small Animal Teaching Hospital for 2 years. He then worked as a Consultant in Small Animal Medicine for IDEXX before undertaking a PhD at the University of Melbourne. His PhD is on gastro-intestinal disease and monitoring of animals on treatment with immune suppressive drugs. Julien’s main interests in medicine include gastrointestinal disease, nephrology, endocrinology, and haematology.
Dr Erin Bell
BVSc BSc(Vet) MVSc FANZCVS (Small Animal Medicine)

Clinical Researcher

Prior to her residency at the University of Melbourne, Erin was a resident at Murdoch University in 2010, and worked in small animal practices in Sydney and Melbourne following her graduation in 2005.
Dr Scott McCann
BSc BVSc(Hons) MVS MANCVS

Resident Small Animal Medicine

Dr Scott McCann graduated from the University of Melbourne in 1999 with a Bachelor of Veterinary Science with honours. After two years working in a dairy practice in Gippsland, Scott moved to the UK and worked in several private small animal general practices. On returning to Australia Scott worked in a busy private small animal clinic in Albert Park while completing a Masters of Veterinary Studies in 2010. He attained a membership of the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Scientists (Small Animal Medicine) in 2011. He now joins us as a Resident in Small Animal Medicine to complete his specialist training.
Dr Judd Sumner
BVSc (Hons) MANZCVS

Resident Small Animal Medicine

Judd graduated with honors from the University of Queensland in 2010. He subsequently went on to work and gain experience in three out of the four Emergency and Critical Care Clinics in South East Queensland. Following this, Judd joined the Internal Medicine team at Veterinary Specialist Services where he gained valuable experience and also gained membership into the Australian and New Zealand College of Veterinary Science in the small animal internal medicine chapter. In January 2015, Judd moved to Melbourne with his wife, new baby girl and two dogs to commence a residency in small animal internal medicine at the University of Melbourne. Judd is passionate about Internal medicine and dedicated to his goal in becoming a specialist in this field.
Dr Helsa Teh
BVSc (Hons) GCVetClinStud MANZCVS

Resident Small Animal Medicine

Helsa graduated from University of Sydney in 2007. After 2 years in small animal private practice undertook a rotating internship at the University of Sydney. On completion of the internship, she continued to work at the University of Sydney in the Emergency and Critical Care and Primary Accession departments. In 2011, Helsa became a member of the Australian College of Veterinary Science in her favourite area; small animal medicine. After a long awaited gap year spent travelling the world in 2014; she commenced her small animal residency at the University of Melbourne. She has a keen interest cardiology and anything relating to cats (especially their thyroid). Her masters research project is in E.coli urinary tract infections in the dog.
Ms Lynne Gillies


Medicine Coordinator

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Dr Alison Stickney


Specialist Small Animal Medicine

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Dr Lucia Yu


Resident

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